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Opening Doors to the World

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Otterbein and the Arts: Opening Doors to the World

Otterbein Opening Doors LogoOtterbein University continues to deepen its commitment to global education with Otterbein and the Arts: Opening Doors to the World, an arts initiative that focuses non-Western regions. Upcoming programming focuses on Latin America (2018-19) and Asia (2018-19). Gateway countries include Brazil, Ecuador, Japan and Nepal.

All events in the series are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.

For more about the FALL 2018 artists and the programming, visit:  https://otterbein.libguides.com/od18

You can also visit Opening Doors to the World on Facebook

Brazil & Ecuador:  Fall 2018

ART EXHIBITIONS

The River is Life
Alice Kohler, photographer
August 22 – November 30
Frank Museum of Art
39 S. Vine Street
Public reception: Thursday, September 20, 4p-6p

Brazilian photographer Alice Kohler has worked and learned with the Araweté people in a remote area of the Amazon basin for over a decade. The River is Life  reveals how this indigenous community lives in close relationship with their environment, and the Xingu River in particular. 

Nothing Missing Leadership in Nature
Introductory Workshop
Jim Drescher
September 5, 2018
Location & Time TBA

Labor and Life
Leonardo Carrizo, photographer
September 17 - December 10
Fisher Gallery, Roush Hall
Public reception: Thursday, October 4, 4p-6p

Leonardo Carrizo, a Columbus-based multimedia photojournalist and educator, specializes in visual storytelling. Through his work as a National Geographic Student Expeditions trip leader and with biological researchers in Ecuador and non-profit organizations, he has traveled from Argentina to Iceland documenting the lives and environments he encounters. Labor and Life features some of Carrizo's most stunning images from Ecuador, arranged as intimate vignettes that speak about the people and their lives on the land.

THEATER

ACT OUT Reading Series 
This year's ACT OUT Reading Series explores the voice of Puerto Rican playwrights.

Adoration of the Old Woman
by Jose Rivera
Tuesday, September 18 at 7:30pm
Philomathean Room, Towers Hall

Puerto Rican playwright Jose Rivera explores the debate regarding Puerto Rican independence. Written in the mid 2000’s and set in “near-future” Puerto Rico, the play combines a fantastical exploration of the ghosts of the past with real and still timely questions regarding Puerto Rico’s self-determination.

The Act Out Reading Series Mission Statement
The Otterbein University Theatre and Dance Department's Act Out Reading Series empowers student theatre artists to investigate dramatic material that explores different cultures, ethnicities, genders, sexualities, and other facets of identity.  This initiative is especially important to Otterbein Theater and Dance. Although we are deeply committed to diversity in casting and material, we sometimes find it difficult -- within the parameters of a theater season or our existing casting pool -- to expose our students to the vast arena of dramatic literature available to them. Act Out gives us the chance to produce informal public readings, with no fee charged, that introduces the university and community to plays that we aren't otherwise able to produce.  The series is student directed, and uses student actors, guided by a faculty advisor.  We seek permission from playwrights to stage these readings using non-traditional casting.  While some actors may embody the ethnicity, gender, or other identity markers for their roles, some may not. This experience gives student actors an opportunity to explore lives and identities very different from their own.  Students are asked to come to the first and only rehearsal well prepared: having immersed themselves in the material and done the necessary research to understand it better (with the support of the student dramaturg and director).  The students then come together for one rehearsal that involves the actors doing table work with the director and dramaturg.  At the public reading, the faculty advisor introduces the reading, providing the context for the Act Out Reading Series' mission.  Following the reading, the audience may stay for a student led talk-back.

Brazil:  Spring 2019

ART EXHIBITIONS

PARAÍSO TROPICAL (TROPICAL PARADISE)
Rosana Pauli
January 16 – April 27
The Frank Museum of Art
Public Reception: Thursday, January 31 

PARAÍSO TROPICAL (TROPICAL PARADISE) directly addresses the process of colonization and slavery in Brazil, to understand the legacies of colonialism and racial constructions in the present. It also challenges the discourse of domination that was normalized by scientific theories in the 19th century. The work also deals with the notion of Brazil as a paradise, but a paradise for whom? The country was seen—and continues to be seen by the national and international elites—as an immense warehouse where people, fauna, and flora are there to be exploited.

Land in Flames
Vítor Mizael
January 7 – May 1
Fisher Gallery
Public Reception: Thursday, January 31

In his works on paper, Vitor Mizael explores issues of Brazilian national identity through the fluid boundaries of the natural world. The artist plays against literary traditions that blend fact and fantasy, remediating and subsuming technical drawings of flora and fauna within fantastical environments.

THEATER

ACT OUT Reading Series 
This year's ACT OUT Reading Series explores the voice of Puerto Rican playwrights.

Water by the Spoonful by Quiara Alegria Hudes
Tuesday, April 9 at 7:30pm
Philomathean Room, Towers Hall

Puerto Rican playwright Quiara Alegrai Hudes explores a Puerto Rican veteran of the Iraq war who is struggling to find meaning and purpose within his family and his community. A diverse community of strangers are struggling to do the same. 

The Act Out Reading Series Mission Statement
The Otterbein University Theatre and Dance Department's Act Out Reading Series empowers student theatre artists to investigate dramatic material that explores different cultures, ethnicities, genders, sexualities, and other facets of identity.  This initiative is especially important to Otterbein Theater and Dance. Although we are deeply committed to diversity in casting and material, we sometimes find it difficult -- within the parameters of a theater season or our existing casting pool -- to expose our students to the vast arena of dramatic literature available to them. Act Out gives us the chance to produce informal public readings, with no fee charged, that introduces the university and community to plays that we aren't otherwise able to produce.  The series is student directed, and uses student actors, guided by a faculty advisor.  We seek permission from playwrights to stage these readings using non-traditional casting.  While some actors may embody the ethnicity, gender, or other identity markers for their roles, some may not. This experience gives student actors an opportunity to explore lives and identities very different from their own.  Students are asked to come to the first and only rehearsal well prepared: having immersed themselves in the material and done the necessary research to understand it better (with the support of the student dramaturg and director).  The students then come together for one rehearsal that involves the actors doing table work with the director and dramaturg.  At the public reading, the faculty advisor introduces the reading, providing the context for the Act Out Reading Series' mission.  Following the reading, the audience may stay for a student led talk-back.


/ Contact

Janice Glowski

Museum & Galleries Director
Art Historian
Department of Art

p / 614.823.1185

 

e / jglowski@otterbein.edu